Waterfalls and wilderness – part 2

Russel Falls, Mt Field National Park, Tasmania

Russell Falls, Mt Field National Park, Tasmania

While setting up to photograph Russell Falls again, a walker stepped into frame to take a shot and I used him for scale. It was only after I took the shot that I realised the mist drifting from the falls onto my lens, gave this shot a kind of primeval quality so characteristic of Tasmanian rain forest. You almost expect dinosaurs to walk into the scene.

The Eucalyptus regnans is one of the tallest trees in the world. This particular example is nearly 80 metres tall. It has been lopped several times in gales. Its first branch is 38 metres from the ground…and it’s still growing!

Self portrait with forest giant, Mt Feiled National Park.

Self portrait with forest giant, Mt Field National Park.

Russell Falls, Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Russell Falls, Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Horseshoe Falls, Mount Field National Park Tasmania

Horseshoe Falls, Mount Field National Park Tasmania

Fungus on decaying log, Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Fungus on decaying log, Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

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2 Comments

Filed under Australian, Photographer, Photography, Rob Walls, Stock photography, travel

2 responses to “Waterfalls and wilderness – part 2

  1. A beautiful place!! that’s a good life to be there
    what a difference with The Netherlands.
    I like to see your pictures from Tasmania.

    Greet,

    Guido

    • Thanks Guido…with only 500,000 population in an area about the size of Ireland there is a lot of space and a multitude of places like this. I live less than 10 minutes from the centre of the capital, Hobart, and our garden is home to possums, wallabies, native hens, the occasional bandicoot, and platypus have been sighted in the stream that borders it. These falls are about a ninety minute drive (and a thirty minute walk) from my home.

      You know, of course, of the strong Dutch connections to Tasmania; that it was originally called Van Diemen’s Land? There are still some Dutch place names here and a very high number of your countrymen living here. We even have an annual Oliebollen and tulip festival in Hobart about this time of year. Though I embraced most aspects of Dutch cuisine , such as Maatjes and smoked eel, the allure of the oliebollen escapes me:-)

      In reality I’m a city boy. Much prefer urban life and surroundings, which is why my comment about the untidiness of nature.

      Beste…

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